Isotope-inferred temperature variations in Northern Patagonia are asynchronous with global records over the last 1000-y (reescheduled)

What:
Talk
When:
16:30, Wednesday 29 Jun 2022 (15 minutes)
Where:
Classroom (SH-3420)
How:

The current climate warming is unique in terms of its ubiquity and synchrony on a global scale. Over the last millennium, pre-industrial periods with warmer and colder temperatures occurred at different times in different locations around the globe (Neukom et al., 2019). Long-term temperature reconstructions in the Southern Hemisphere remain sparse and not always consistent among them (Lara et al., 2020). Therefore, to understand the temporal and spatial patterns of global-scale temperature variations, reconstructions are still needed in this part of the world.
Here, we present an annually resolved, a 1025-year long reconstruction of summer temperature in Northern Patagonia. It was build using the d13C of the tree-rings from 6 Fitzroya cupressoides from Rio Alerce, northern Patagonia (41.19S, 71.77W). All trees cover the whole period. 
Our d13C chronology shows that Patagonia underwent cold phases during 1100-1350 and 1650-1750, and warm phases during 1400-1650 and since 1900. These temperature variations are not consistent with the putative Medieval Climate Anomaly and Little ice Age, which occurred roughly in 800-1200 and 1300-1850 in Europe and North America. Surprisingly, the d13C-derived temperature pattern does not match with the one reconstructed from tree-ring width from the same species. Over the last century, the d13C variations are consistent with observed Pacific Decadal Oscillation and Antarctic Oscillation fingerprints. 
 

Speaker
Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement / Université de Versailles Saint Quentin
Professor
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