Tracing the Origins of Dogsledding in North America: a critical review of key archaeological sites in Alaska and Western Canada - Katherine Latham

Thème:
Chiens
Quoi:
Talk
Quand:
samedi 5 oct.   09:30 AM à 10:00 AM (30 minutes)
Où:
Discussion:
0
Archaeological evidence suggests that domestic dogs have been living in the Arctic regions of North America for at least 4,000 years but surprisingly little is known about their working relationships with humans until the historic period. Though dogsledding was a critical component of daily life for Inuit of the recent past, the origins and long-term history of dogsledding in the North American Arctic are unclear. Sled parts and dog harness parts dating back some 2,000 years have been reported from archaeological sites in Alaska and Western Canada but there but there has been little formal analysis of these materials. Furthermore, no systematic analysis of the archaeological record of dogsledding in this region has been attempted, making it difficult to interpret the emergence, distribution, and evolution of these technologies and practices. Review of archaeological sites in the Western Arctic suggests that dogsledding technology had developed at least by the 13th century in Western Canada. Further investigation of the archaeological record of dogsledding in this region will establish a long-term chronology of dogsledding practices for this region and offer a glimpse into the origins and evolution of dogsledding in the broader Arctic
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