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Dr Donna-Lee Frieze

Research Fellow
Deakin University
Participates in 1 Session
Dr Frieze is a Genocide studies scholar, specializing in memory and aftermath studies. Donna is a Research Fellow and teaches the Holocaust at Deakin University, a Visiting Scholar at the Centre for Genocide and Human Rights at Rutgers University and a genocide scholar in residence at the Jewish Holocaust Centre in Melbourne. She taught a graduate unit, Genocide, for over 10 years and has published widely on the Armenian genocide, the Holocaust and the Bosnian genocides in relation to testimony, film and philosophy. She has been invited to speak at Columbia University and to guest lecture at New York University. 

She was the 2013-2014 Prins Senior Scholar at the Centre for Jewish History in NYC.

Donna is the editor and transcriber of Raphael Lemkin’s autobiography, Totally Unofficial(Yale University Press, 2013) and co-author with Steven Cooke of The Interior of Our Memories’: A History of Melbourne’s Jewish Holocaust Centre, (Hybrid, 2015). Donna is the past First Vice-President of the International Association of Genocide Scholars and a current member of the Advisory Board.

Sessions in which Dr Donna-Lee Frieze participates

Saturday 4 June, 2016

Time Zone: (GMT-05:00) Eastern Time (US & Canada)

Sessions in which Dr Donna-Lee Frieze attends

Saturday 4 June, 2016

Time Zone: (GMT-05:00) Eastern Time (US & Canada)
9:00
9:00 - 10:00 | 1 hour
Public event
Simultaneous translation - Traduction simultanée

What if we changed our views on heritage? And if heritage has already changed? While, on the global scene, states maintain their leading role in the mobilization of social and territorial histories, on the local scale, regions, neighbourhoods and parishes have changed. Citizens and communities too: they latch on to heritage to express an unprecedented range of belongings that no law seems to be able to take measures to contain, often to the discontent of...

18:30
18:30 - 20:00 | 1 hour 30 minutes
Public event
Simultaneous translation - Traduction simultanée

Most of what we experience as heritage emerges into conscious recognition through a complex mixture of political and ideological filters, including nationalism.  In these processes, through a variety of devices (museums, scholarly research, consumer reproduction, etc.), dualistic classifications articulate a powerful hierarchy of value and significance.  In particular, the tangible-intangible pair, given legitimacy by such international bodies as UNESCO, reproduces a selective ordering of cul...

Sunday 5 June, 2016

Time Zone: (GMT-05:00) Eastern Time (US & Canada)
9:00
9:00 - 12:30 | 3 hours 30 minutes
Heritage Changes PlaceCo-Construction and Community Based HeritageMuseums
14:00
14:00 - 15:30 | 1 hour 30 minutes
Co-Construction and Community Based HeritageHeritage Changes the Social OrderCitizenshipPublic event
Simultaneous translation - Traduction simultanée

"What does heritage change?" is a multifaceted  question to which the answer(s) are in primary respects related to real-life negotiations among different groups of citizens, cultures, races, ethnic groups, sexual identities, and social classes about received, official and/or widely accepted or accomodated intangible attributes, cultural traditions, historic monuments, buildings, and other transmitted or revived historical legacies. Heritage designated by and for whom, for what motivations, an...

Monday 6 June, 2016

Time Zone: (GMT-05:00) Eastern Time (US & Canada)
13:30
13:30 - 15:00 | 1 hour 30 minutes
Research-Creation Installation or PerformanceHeritage in ConflictsOral History

Tuesday 7 June, 2016

Time Zone: (GMT-05:00) Eastern Time (US & Canada)
9:00
9:00 - 12:30 | 3 hours 30 minutes
Heritage Changes the Living EnvironmentIntangible HeritageMuseums
Heritage changes placeCo-construction of heritageCommunity-based heritageHeritage makers