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Dr Elizabeth Vlossak

Associate Professor and Graduate Program Director
Brock University
Participates in 2 items
Elizabeth Vlossak (B.A., Mount Allison; M.St., Oxford; Ph.D., Cambridge) is an Associate Professor and the Graduate Program Director in the Department of History at Brock University (St Catharines, Canada). She teaches 20th-century European history, including courses on Weimar and Nazi Germany, nations and nationalism, and gender in modern European history. She is the author of Marianne or Germania? Nationalizing Women in Alsace, 1870-1946 (Oxford University Press, 2010). Her other publications include: “Remembering Oradour and Struthof: How Regional Memory Challenges National Commemoration,” in Place and Locality in Modern France, ed. Patrick Young and Philip Whalen (Bloomsbury, 2014); “Traitors, heroes, martyrs, victims: Veterans of Nazi ‘forced conscription’ in Alsace and Moselle,” in Rewriting German History: New Perspectives on Modern Germany, ed. Nikolaus Wachsmann and Jan Rüger (Palgrave, 2015); and ‘‘The Civil War in France, Alsace-Lorraine, and Postwar Reconstruction in the 1870s,” in Decades of Reconstruction: Postwar Societies, State-building, and International Relations, from the Seven Years War to the Cold War, ed. Ute Planert and James Retallack (Cambridge University Press, 2016). Her research focuses on gender and nationalism, the cultural history of the two world wars, and the politics of memory and commemoration. She is currently working on her second book, tentatively entitled Hitler’s Unwilling Soldiers: Nazi Forced Conscription in History and Memory which explores the reintegration of non-German Wehrmacht veterans into postwar society.

Sessions in which Dr Elizabeth Vlossak participates

Saturday 4 June, 2016

Time Zone: (GMT-05:00) Eastern Time (US & Canada)
15:30 - 17:00 | 1 hour 30 minutes
Heritage Changes the Local SocietiesNotions of Heritage

Sessions in which Dr Elizabeth Vlossak attends

Friday 3 June, 2016

Time Zone: (GMT-05:00) Eastern Time (US & Canada)
17:00 - 19:30 | 2 hours 30 minutes
Festive Event

Saturday 4 June, 2016

Time Zone: (GMT-05:00) Eastern Time (US & Canada)
9:00 - 10:00 | 1 hour
Public event
Simultaneous translation - Traduction simultanée

What if we changed our views on heritage? And if heritage has already changed? While, on the global scene, states maintain their leading role in the mobilization of social and territorial histories, on the local scale, regions, neighbourhoods and parishes have changed. Citizens and communities too: they latch on to heritage to express an unprecedented range of belongings that no law seems to be able to take measures to contain, often to the discontent of...

18:30 - 20:00 | 1 hour 30 minutes
Public event
Simultaneous translation - Traduction simultanée

Most of what we experience as heritage emerges into conscious recognition through a complex mixture of political and ideological filters, including nationalism.  In these processes, through a variety of devices (museums, scholarly research, consumer reproduction, etc.), dualistic classifications articulate a powerful hierarchy of value and significance.  In particular, the tangible-intangible pair, given legitimacy by such international bodies as UNESCO, reproduces a selective ordering of cul...

Sunday 5 June, 2016

Time Zone: (GMT-05:00) Eastern Time (US & Canada)
14:00 - 15:30 | 1 hour 30 minutes
Co-Construction and Community Based HeritageHeritage Changes the Social OrderCitizenshipPublic event
Simultaneous translation - Traduction simultanée

"What does heritage change?" is a multifaceted  question to which the answer(s) are in primary respects related to real-life negotiations among different groups of citizens, cultures, races, ethnic groups, sexual identities, and social classes about received, official and/or widely accepted or accomodated intangible attributes, cultural traditions, historic monuments, buildings, and other transmitted or revived historical legacies. Heritage designated by and for whom, for what motivations, an...