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William Moss

Chef d'équipe-archéologue
Ville de Québec
Participates in 1 Session
William Moss has been Chief Archæologist for the City of Québec since 1985 where he coordinates municipal archæological heritage management for this UNESCO World Heritage City, the first such position in Canada. Mr. Moss has worked as an archæologist in England (Royal Ontario Museum, Peterborough; Royal Albert Memorial Museum, Exeter) and, in the province of Québec, for Parks Canada and the provincial Culture and Communications Department. He is a sessional lecturer at Laval University and is regularly to speak across Québec and abroad. A past president of the Society for Historical Archæology, Mr. Moss is active in several learned societies; he is a fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London. He has received several awards from the tourist industry for his activities as a conference organizer. He has published widely, notably as guest editor of a thematic issue on the early modern period in Québec City simultaneously published in French (“L’archéologie récente des débuts de Québec”, Archéologiques, vol. 22) and in English (“The recent archæology of the early modern period in Québec City”, Post-Medieval Archæology, 43:1) in 2009. A publication on urban archæology around the world (Urban Archæology, Municipal Government and Local Planning: Preserving Heritage within the Commonwealth of Nations and the United States), jointly edited with Sherene Baugher and Douglas Appler, will be published in 2016. More than 200 studies – many of which have been published by the CÉLAT or in learned journals – have been prepared under his direction as Chief Archæologist. The projects carried out under his supervision have contributed to the conservation and development of numerous sites and have generated an important body of knowledge that has been successfully communicated to the local population.. Laval University awarded him an honorary Ph.D. in 2014 for his contribution to the knowledge of, the protection and the development of Québec City’s archæological heritage.

Sessions in which William Moss participates

Monday 6 June, 2016

Time Zone: (GMT-05:00) Eastern Time (US & Canada)

Sessions in which William Moss attends

Saturday 4 June, 2016

Time Zone: (GMT-05:00) Eastern Time (US & Canada)
18:30
18:30 - 20:00 | 1 hour 30 minutes
Public event
Simultaneous translation - Traduction simultanée

Most of what we experience as heritage emerges into conscious recognition through a complex mixture of political and ideological filters, including nationalism.  In these processes, through a variety of devices (museums, scholarly research, consumer reproduction, etc.), dualistic classifications articulate a powerful hierarchy of value and significance.  In particular, the tangible-intangible pair, given legitimacy by such international bodies as UNESCO, reproduces a selective ordering of cul...

Sunday 5 June, 2016

Time Zone: (GMT-05:00) Eastern Time (US & Canada)
14:00
14:00 - 15:30 | 1 hour 30 minutes
Co-Construction and Community Based HeritageHeritage Changes the Social OrderCitizenshipPublic event
Simultaneous translation - Traduction simultanée

"What does heritage change?" is a multifaceted  question to which the answer(s) are in primary respects related to real-life negotiations among different groups of citizens, cultures, races, ethnic groups, sexual identities, and social classes about received, official and/or widely accepted or accomodated intangible attributes, cultural traditions, historic monuments, buildings, and other transmitted or revived historical legacies. Heritage designated by and for whom, for what motivations, an...

Monday 6 June, 2016

Time Zone: (GMT-05:00) Eastern Time (US & Canada)
15:30
15:30 - 17:00 | 1 hour 30 minutes
Public event
Simultaneous translation - Traduction simultanée

Le patrimoine fait aujourd’hui l’objet d’attentions autant que d’agressions et de destructions. Cela peut s’expliquer par les difficultés de son identification ou de sa conservation. Cela peut plus profondément s’expliquer parce que, dès le départ, il célébre un événement ou conserve une mémoire qui peut être ou devenir une source de dissenssions et de conflits politiques. Enfin, sa reconnaissance suscite des gains économiques pour les uns mais des pertes pour les autres. Mais peut-être...