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Prof. Ullrich Kockel

Professor
Intercultural Research Centre, Heriot-Watt University
Participates in 5 items
Ullrich Kockel is Professor of Culture and Economy at Heriot-Watt University. From 2000 until 2005 he was Professor of European Studies at the University of the West of England, Bristol, before moving to the University of Ulster as Professor of Ethnology and Folk Life. In 2012 he became Emeritus at Ulster, but has subsequently been appointed part-time to a Chair at Heriot-Watt. He is a Visiting Professor of Social Anthropology at Vytautas Magnus University, Kaunas (2011-18). A Fellow of the United Kingdom’s Academy of the Social Sciences and a Member of the Royal Irish Academy, he has been an active member of international scholarly associations in the fields of anthropology and ethnology, and from 2008 until 2013 was President of the Société Internationale d’Ethnologie et de Folklore. Kockel, U. (2010), Re-Visioning Europe: Frontiers, Place Identities and Journeys in Debatable Lands (Palgrave). Kockel, U. (2012), ‘Toward an Ethnoecology of Place and Displacement.’ In: Ullrich Kockel, Máiréad Nic Craith and Jonas Frykman (eds), A Companion to the Anthropology of Europe (Blackwell), 551-571. Kockel, U. (2012), ‘Being From and Coming To: Outline of an Ethno-Ecological Framework.’ In: Lewis Williams, Rose Roberts and Alastair McIntosh (eds), Radical Human Ecology: Intercultural and Indigenous Approaches (Ashgate), 57-71. Kockel, U. (2015), ‘Die DEUTSCHE JUGEND DES OSTENS und die Burg Ludwigstein (1951-1975).’ In: Susanne Rappe-Weber and Eckard Conze (eds), Ludwigstein – Annäherungen an die Geschichte der Burg (Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht), 313-333. Kockel, U. (2015), ‘Re-placing Europe: An Ethnological Perspective on Frontiers and Migrants.’ In: Christopher Whitehead, Katherine Lloyd, Susannah Eckersley and Rhiannon Mason (eds), Museums, Place and Identity in Europe (Ashgate), 81-100. Logan, William, Kockel, U. & Nic Craith, Máiréad (2016), ‘The New Heritage Studies: Origins and Evolution, Problems and Prospects.’ In: William Logan, Máiréad Nic Craith and Ullrich Kockel (eds), A Companion to Heritage Studies, Wiley-Blackwell 2015, 1-25.

Sessions in which Prof. Ullrich Kockel participates

Friday 3 June, 2016

Time Zone: (GMT-05:00) Eastern Time (US & Canada)
13:00 - 15:00 | 2 hours
Heritage as an Agent of Change (Epistemologies, Ontologies, Teaching)

Saturday 4 June, 2016

Time Zone: (GMT-05:00) Eastern Time (US & Canada)
11:00 - 15:00 | 4 hours
Heritage Changes the Local SocietiesCitizenshipTourism
Heritage changes the local societiesheritage and mobilityPost-colonial heritageGlobal vs local

Sunday 5 June, 2016

Time Zone: (GMT-05:00) Eastern Time (US & Canada)
9:00 - 12:30 | 3 hours 30 minutes
Heritage Changes the Local SocietiesCitizenshipTourism

Tuesday 7 June, 2016

Time Zone: (GMT-05:00) Eastern Time (US & Canada)
15:30 - 17:00 | 1 hour 30 minutes
Heritage Changes the Policies
Heritage changes the policiesHeritage policiesGlobal vs local

Sessions in which Prof. Ullrich Kockel attends

Friday 3 June, 2016

Time Zone: (GMT-05:00) Eastern Time (US & Canada)
13:00 - 15:00 | 2 hours
Heritage as an Agent of Change (Epistemologies, Ontologies, Teaching)

Saturday 4 June, 2016

Time Zone: (GMT-05:00) Eastern Time (US & Canada)
18:30 - 20:00 | 1 hour 30 minutes
Public event
Simultaneous translation - Traduction simultanée

Most of what we experience as heritage emerges into conscious recognition through a complex mixture of political and ideological filters, including nationalism.  In these processes, through a variety of devices (museums, scholarly research, consumer reproduction, etc.), dualistic classifications articulate a powerful hierarchy of value and significance.  In particular, the tangible-intangible pair, given legitimacy by such international bodies as UNESCO, reproduces a selective ordering of cul...

Tuesday 7 June, 2016

Time Zone: (GMT-05:00) Eastern Time (US & Canada)
19:00 - 23:00 | 4 hours
Festive Event

The closing dinner of the conference, called “Pawâ” according to a French-Canadian tradition borrowed from the Native American lexicon, will be an opportunity to discover, in the heart of the Old Port of Montreal, an original culinary creation by the caterer Agnus Dei, from the renowned Maison Cartier-Besson in Montreal, leader in its field for its boundless creativity and event expertise. The dinner, in the form of stations, will offer delegates an exploration of Quebecois culinary heritage,...