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Dr Milan Balaban

Scientific Researcher - Historian
Tomas Bata University in Zlin
Participates in 3 items

Milan Balaban was born on 03.07.1981, in Banja Luka, Bosnia and Herzegovina. He finished his bachelor studies at University of Banja Luka and his master and doctoral studies at the Masaryk University in Czech Republic, where he defended his dissertation project with the topic” Yugoslav-Czechoslovak Economic Relations between 1918-1938 year”. He had worked at Department of History in Banja Luka and since 2015 has worked as scientific researcher-historian at the Bata Information Centre at Tomas Bata University in Zlin, Czech Republic. His main research areas are history of the Bata Company and Czechoslovak-Yugoslav economic relations. M. Balaban is author of numerous articles published in Czech and foreign scientific journals and he recently published monograph: The Bata Company in Yugoslavia (Zlín 2018, ISBN: 978-80-7454-800-0).

Documents

Sessions in which Dr Milan Balaban participates

Thursday 1 September, 2022

Time Zone: (GMT-05:00) Eastern Time (US & Canada)

Sessions in which Dr Milan Balaban attends

Sunday 28 August, 2022

Time Zone: (GMT-05:00) Eastern Time (US & Canada)
5:00 PM
5:00 PM - 7:00 PM | 2 hours

Tuesday 30 August, 2022

Time Zone: (GMT-05:00) Eastern Time (US & Canada)

Wednesday 31 August, 2022

Time Zone: (GMT-05:00) Eastern Time (US & Canada)
5:30 PM
5:30 PM - 7:00 PM | 1 hour 30 minutes

In this lecture, I would like to talk about deindustrialised communities, heritage and memory in the context of right-wing populism. Drawing on studies of memory and heritage, I argue that right-wing populists have cornered the market on talking about the past of deindustrialised communities. They have successfully misrepresented this rich and complex history to fuel rage, resentment, fear and reactionary nostalgia. Indeed, ‘the past’, and in particular the industr...

Thursday 1 September, 2022

Time Zone: (GMT-05:00) Eastern Time (US & Canada)
11:00 AM
11:00 AM - 12:30 PM | 1 hour 30 minutes

The use of industrial heritage is a profoundly important factor in the process of creating a sustainable economic, social, and political future for many communities occupying industrial heritage landscapes. More than ever we recognize the need for such communities to be capable of shaping and expressing their heritage in different forms in the context of current events and issues, and in doing so to inform both contemporary decision-making as well as the way their industrial heritage is re...

Sponsored by:
1:30 PM
1:30 PM - 3:00 PM | 1 hour 30 minutes

This lecture will argue that the landscapes of industrial heritage that can be found in different parts of the world are directly related to the place-specific trajectories of deindustrialization. In other words: the different ways in which deindustrialization impacts on local communities has a direct bearing on the emergence of forms of industrial heritage. I will differentialte between deindustrialization paths and related industrial heritage regimes in a) Anglo-...

Friday 2 September, 2022

Time Zone: (GMT-05:00) Eastern Time (US & Canada)
3:30 PM
3:30 PM - 5:00 PM | 1 hour 30 minutes

In the refusal of people in communities abandoned by industrial capital to abandon their own places, we can read an implicit critique of the mobility and unaccountability of capital, raised by those who were once inside (however tenuously or uncomfortably) and now find themselves marginalized, “left behind.” The desire to catch up again, whether through attracting new investment or transvaluing abandoned sites as tourist attractions, makes this an essentially conservative critique that is ...