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Oana Cristina Tiganea

Assistant Professor in Architectural Preservation
Politecnico di Milano
Participates in 2 items

Oana Cristina Ţiganea (1982, Alba Iulia – Romania) is an architect specialized in the field of cultural heritage, with an academic path divided between Romania and Italy. Her main research field is Romanian industrial architecture dating the recent past (1945 – 1989) and its patrimonial potential value, approached during her doctoral studies developed at Politecnico di Milano (2010 – 2013) and, furthermore, during her post-doctoral scholarship in Bucharest at “New Europe College” Institute for Advanced Studies (2016 – 2017). Currently, she is a researcher at Politecnico di Milano (DAStU), and a component member of the Territorial Fragilities research project. During 2014 and 2018, she coordinated the cultural project “Anina, Mine of Ideas” focused on the preservation and enhancement of the mining heritage from Anina (Romania), being responsible for the project drafting, organization, and implementation. 

Her latest research project “Stei, the Secret Uranium City: Industrial Legacy between Ecology and Architectural Preservation” will tackle strategies and practices of the preservation of the industrial legacy facing the ecological footprint in connection with its patrimonial acknowledgement and economic enhancement. These issues will be approached through the case study of Ştei, a former industrial town built in the early 1950s as headquarters of the Soviet uranium exploitation sites in Romania during the Cold War. The closing of the uranium mine in 2008 led to its territorial, economic, and socio-cultural isolation while facing the issues of contamination and radon radiations of the built and natural environment. 

Fields of interest: industrial architecture in Romania dating the 20th century, steel industry in socialist Romania (1945 - 1989), mining industry and territories, uranium exploitation in Eastern Europe (Cold War), industrial heritage studies; industrial heritage preservation. 

Sessions in which Oana Cristina Tiganea participates

Sessions in which Oana Cristina Tiganea attends

Monday 29 August, 2022

Time Zone: (GMT-05:00) Eastern Time (US & Canada)
5:30 PM
5:30 PM - 7:00 PM | 1 hour 30 minutes

Si la vallée du canal de Lachine a été le berceau de l’industrialisation canadienne, la géographie industrielle métropolitaine ne s’y est pas confinée, peu s’en faut, Outre les grandes concentrations d’entreprises des quartiers centraux, elle est constituée des réseaux infrastructuraux, d’une douzaine de centrales hydroélectriques et des ensembles manufacturiers disséminés dans une quinzaine de petites villes aujourd’hui intégrées dans l’aire métropolitaine. La conférence proposera un surv...

Gérard Beaudet

Keynote speaker

Wednesday 31 August, 2022

Time Zone: (GMT-05:00) Eastern Time (US & Canada)
5:30 PM
5:30 PM - 7:00 PM | 1 hour 30 minutes

In this lecture, I would like to talk about deindustrialised communities, heritage and memory in the context of right-wing populism. Drawing on studies of memory and heritage, I argue that right-wing populists have cornered the market on talking about the past of deindustrialised communities. They have successfully misrepresented this rich and complex history to fuel rage, resentment, fear and reactionary nostalgia. Indeed, ‘the past’, and in particular the industr...

Thursday 1 September, 2022

Time Zone: (GMT-05:00) Eastern Time (US & Canada)
7:00 AM
7:00 AM - 8:30 AM | 1 hour 30 minutes

From its construction to its restoration, immerse yourself in the now and then of this key Canadian industrial heritage site. A country’s central maritime route, a major inland port, the Canadian Lowell (using hydraulic power), the cradle of industrialization, Smokey Valley (using steam), a manufacturing hotspot, the Lachine Canal is all of this and more. For it is also a national historic site, for which

11:00 AM
11:00 AM - 12:30 PM | 1 hour 30 minutes

The use of industrial heritage is a profoundly important factor in the process of creating a sustainable economic, social, and political future for many communities occupying industrial heritage landscapes. More than ever we recognize the need for such communities to be capable of shaping and expressing their heritage in different forms in the context of current events and issues, and in doing so to inform both contemporary decision-making as well as the way their industrial heritage is re...

Sponsored by:
1:30 PM
1:30 PM - 3:00 PM | 1 hour 30 minutes

This lecture will argue that the landscapes of industrial heritage that can be found in different parts of the world are directly related to the place-specific trajectories of deindustrialization. In other words: the different ways in which deindustrialization impacts on local communities has a direct bearing on the emergence of forms of industrial heritage. I will differentialte between deindustrialization paths and related industrial heritage regimes in a) Anglo-...

3:30 PM
3:30 PM - 5:30 PM | 2 hours

The South Central district is a former industrial and working-class neighbourhood with a rich and unique heritage. The visit will allow us to discover, among other things, the Macdonald Tobacco factory and the Raymond candy factory, the old workers' housing typical of the district, and the reuse of old buildings for cultural and community purposes. The activity will start at the Frontenac metro station and will end with a visit to the Écomusée du fier monde. Staff will be avail...

Sponsored by:

Friday 2 September, 2022

Time Zone: (GMT-05:00) Eastern Time (US & Canada)
7:00 AM
7:00 AM - 8:30 AM | 1 hour 30 minutes

Walkers will meet at the entrance (there is only one) of Lionel Groulx Metro and from there walk along the canal to the St-Gabriel Locks. This was once the most heavily industrialized area in Canada. It is now a zone of affluence between the hardscrabble, but now gentrifying, Point Saint-Charles, historically Irish and French, and Little Burgundy, one of Montreal's first multi-racial neighbourhoods. Several former factories were converted into condominiums in the...

3:30 PM
3:30 PM - 5:00 PM | 1 hour 30 minutes

In the refusal of people in communities abandoned by industrial capital to abandon their own places, we can read an implicit critique of the mobility and unaccountability of capital, raised by those who were once inside (however tenuously or uncomfortably) and now find themselves marginalized, “left behind.” The desire to catch up again, whether through attracting new investment or transvaluing abandoned sites as tourist attractions, makes this an essentially conservative critique that is ...