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Elizabeth Carnegie

Northumbria University
Participe à 1 Session
Elizabeth Carnegie’s work is interdisciplinary drawing on sociology, anthropology, material culture studies and social history. She is interested in the body as a site of memory and the way the body passes through memory spaces as visitor/tourist. This project reflects an intergenerational study of the role and meaning of tattoos within seafaring communities. Other work includes a multi-side study of museums in post-communist countries in eastern Europe with a special focus on frozen bodies – monumental statuary. She was a curator before academe and previously taught at Sheffield university and currently teaches tourism and heritage at Northumbria University Derek Bryce's research interests lie mainly in the critical appraisal of the commodification of cultural heritage resources, the rendering of places into destinations and the often contested politics underpinning these. This is expressed principally in his publications examining the politics of 'Western' representation of Islamic culture and destinations, in which he adopts a Foucauldian/post-Saidian approach with notable contributions in the journals including Theory, Culture & Society, Annals of Tourism Research and Environment and Planning A. He is involved in an ongoing project examining the commercialisation of Ottoman cultural heritage in SE Europe and is an external partner in SOAS-University of London's interdisciplinary Centre for Ottoman Studies. His ongoing activity in other contexts includes exploring the culturally contingent notion of 'authenticity' in heritage consumption and the commercialisation of 'real and imagined pasts' in ancestral tourism. Bryce, D 2013, 'The absence of Ottoman, Islamic Europe in Edward W. Said's Orientalism', Theory, Culture and Society , vol. 30, no. 1, pp. 99-121. Bryce, D and Carnegie, E. (2013)‘Exhibiting the ‘Orient’: reception of theory in curatorial practice in UK museums and galleries’, Environment and Planning A,45(7) pages 1734 – 1752 Bryce, D, Murdy, S & Alexander, M 2017, 'Diaspora, authenticity and the imagined past', Annals of Tourism Research, vol. 66, pp. 49-60. Carnegie, E. and Kociatkiewicz, J. (2021) Dances with Despots: exploring the tourist role among the ‘ghosts’ of past regimes within Eastern Europe, Special Issue Peace through Tourism, Journal of Sustainable Tourism Carnegie, E. and Kociatkiewicz, J. (2019) Occupying Whateverland: journeys to museums in the Baltic, Annals of Tourism, 75, 2019, p. 238-247 Carnegie, E and Drencheva, A. (2019) Mission-driven arts organisations and initiatives: Surviving and thriving locally in a time of rupture, Special Issue, Art in a time of Rupture, Arts and the Market, 9(2) 178-187 Carnegie, E. and Kociatkiewicz, J. (2019) Occupying Whateverland: journeys to museums in the Baltic, Annals of Tourism (Research 4 * Journal). O’Reilly, D. and Doherty, K. and Carnegie, E. and Larsen, G. (2017) ‘Cultural memory and the heritagisation of a music consumption community’, Arts and the Market, Vol. 7 Issue: 2, pp.174-190 (won Emerald Literati award for excellence: Best paper Award 2018) Tucker, H. and Carnegie, E (2014). World Heritage and the Contradictory Values of Universal Value’. Annals of Tourism Research 47 (2014) 63–76

Sessions auxquelles Elizabeth Carnegie participe

Jeudi 1 Septembre, 2022

Fuseau horaire: (GMT-05:00) Eastern Time (US & Canada)

Sessions auxquelles Elizabeth Carnegie assiste

Mardi 30 Août, 2022

Fuseau horaire: (GMT-05:00) Eastern Time (US & Canada)

Mercredi 31 Août, 2022

Fuseau horaire: (GMT-05:00) Eastern Time (US & Canada)
5:30 PM
5:30 PM - 7:00 PM | 1 heure 30 minutes

In this lecture, I would like to talk about deindustrialised communities, heritage and memory in the context of right-wing populism. Drawing on studies of memory and heritage, I argue that right-wing populists have cornered the market on talking about the past of deindustrialised communities. They have successfully misrepresented this rich and complex history to fuel rage, resentment, fear and reactionary nostalgia. Indeed, ‘the past’, and in particular the industr...

Prof. Laurajane Smith

Conférencier.ère

Jeudi 1 Septembre, 2022

Fuseau horaire: (GMT-05:00) Eastern Time (US & Canada)
1:30 PM
1:30 PM - 3:00 PM | 1 heure 30 minutes

This lecture will argue that the landscapes of industrial heritage that can be found in different parts of the world are directly related to the place-specific trajectories of deindustrialization. In other words: the different ways in which deindustrialization impacts on local communities has a direct bearing on the emergence of forms of industrial heritage. I will differentialte between deindustrialization paths and related industrial heritage regimes in a) Anglo-...

Stefan Berger

Conférencier.ère

Vendredi 2 Septembre, 2022

Fuseau horaire: (GMT-05:00) Eastern Time (US & Canada)
3:30 PM
3:30 PM - 5:00 PM | 1 heure 30 minutes

In the refusal of people in communities abandoned by industrial capital to abandon their own places, we can read an implicit critique of the mobility and unaccountability of capital, raised by those who were once inside (however tenuously or uncomfortably) and now find themselves marginalized, “left behind.” The desire to catch up again, whether through attracting new investment or transvaluing abandoned sites as tourist attractions, makes this an essentially conservative critique that is ...

Cathy Stanton

Conférencier.ère